Hogmanay and elephants! Scottish roots of Auld Lang Syne and tradition reach worldwide- I have joined the World Wide Ceilidh –

Such fun, wonderful festive season feasts, elephants galore, rain  and happy guests….

this is the early morning view downriver from Room 5 at Chilo Gorge – a lone bull elephant crossing the Save River through gentle rain, in front of Mahenye Island…….

elephant crossing rainy river

elephant crossing rainy river

We are at Chilo Gorge, and plan to celebrate the coming of the New Year (Hogmanay) with Scottish traditions which have permeated the whole world…such as building a fire to see out the old year and bring in the New…and singing Auld Lang Syne at the stroke of midnight…

Auld Lang Syne

(Rabbie Burns version)

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and auld lang syne*?

CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my jo,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll tak’ a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint-stoup!
and surely I’ll be mine!
And we’ll tak’ a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We twa hae run about the braes,
and pou’d the gowans fine;
But we’ve wander’d mony a weary fit,
sin’ auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We twa hae paidl’d in the burn,
frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
sin’ auld lang syne.

CHORUS

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere!
and gie’s a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak’ a right gude-willie waught,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS
Auld Lang Syne

Auld Lang Syne

Auld Lang Syne is an ancient verse re-writted by Robert Burns, who  sent a copy of the original song to the Scots Musical Museum with the remark, “The following song, an old song, of the olden times, and which has never been in print, nor even in manuscript until I took it down from an old man.”Some of the lyrics were indeed “collected” rather than composed by the poet; the ballad “Old Long Syne” printed in 1711 by James Watson shows considerable similarity in the first verse and the chorus to Burns’ later poem,and is almost certainly derived from the same “old song”.

Should Old Acquaintance be forgot,
and never thought upon;
The flames of Love extinguished,
and fully past and gone:
Is thy sweet Heart now grown so cold,
that loving Breast of thine;
That thou canst never once reflect
On Old long syne.

CHORUS:
On Old long syne my Jo,
On Old long syne,
That thou canst never once reflect,
On Old long syne.

It is a fair supposition to attribute the rest of the poem to Burns himself.

here is the English version for non-Scots……

Auld lang Syne – English version

Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should 
old acquaintance be forgot,
and 
old lang syne?

CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll take a cup of kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And surely you’ll buy your pintcup!
and surely I’ll 
buy mine!
And we’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We two have run about theslopes,
and 
picked the daisies fine;
But we’ve wandered 
many a weary foot,
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We two have paddled in thestream,
from morning sun till dine†;
But seas between us 
broad have roared
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

And there’s a hand my trustyfriend!
And 
give me a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll 
take a right good-will draught,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS
Oh! just for fun, visit the link below to see us dancing!

World Wide Ceilidh – From www.scotland.org, the official gateway site to Scotland.

and here are some interesting Hogmanay facts:

Hogmanay is the Scots word for the last day of the year and is synonymous with the celebration of the New Year in the Scottish manner.

  1. Nobody knows for sure where the word ‘Hogmanay’ came from. It may have originated from Gaelic or from Norman-French
  2. Historically, Christmas was not observed as a festival and Hogmanay was the more traditional celebration in Scotland. The winter solstice holiday tended to be at New Year when family and friends gathered for a party and exchange presents, especially for the children.
  3. The Bells’ is the phrase used to describe the midnight hour when New Year’s Eve becomes New Year’s Day.
  4. Burns’ ‘Auld Lang Syne’ is sung to celebrate the start of the New Year at the stroke of midnight, not just in Scotland but in many English-speaking countries.
  5. The Guinness Book of World Records lists ‘Auld Lang Syne’ as one of the most frequently sung songs in English. The song is sung or played in many movies, from ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ to ‘When Harry Met Sally.’
  6. To sing ‘Auld Lang Syne’ a circle is created and hands are joined with the person on each side of you. At the beginning of the last verse, everyone crosses their arms across their breast, so that the right hand reaches out to the neighbour on the left and vice versa. When the tune ends, everyone rushes to the middle, while still holding hands.
  7. An important element of Hogmanay celebrations is to welcome friends and strangers, with warm hospitality and of course a kiss to wish everyone a ‘Guid New Year’. The underlying belief is to clear out the vestiges of the old year, have a clean break and welcome in a young, New Year on a happy note.
  8. First Footing’ – the ‘first foot’ in the house after midnight is still very common is Scotland. To ensure good luck, a first footer should be a dark-haired male. Fair-haired first footers were not particularly welcome after the Viking invasions of ancient times. Traditional gifts include a lump of coal to lovingly place on the host’s fire, along with shortbread, a black bun and whisky to toast to a Happy New Year.
  9. To first foot a household empty-handed is considered grossly discourteous, never mind unlucky!
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About wineandwilddogs

Lin Barrie The Save Valley Conservancy stretches along the upper reaches of the great Save River in the south east of Zimbabwe. The Gonarezhou National Park laps against the southern banks of the Save River and between these two nestles the Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve. These three celebrated wildlife areas form part of the Greater Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Area, (GLTFCA)- a unique wilderness jewel which is home to the “Big Five” (endangered Black and White rhinos, elephants, buffalo, lion, leopard) and the ”Little Six” (Klipspringer, Suni, Duiker, Steenbok, Sharpe's Grysbok and Oribi). Endangered African wild dogs, Cheetah, Brown hyena, Bat-eared foxes and a host of special birds and plants contribute to the immense variety of this ecosystem. Communities around the GLTFCA contribute to innovative partnerships with National Parks and the private sector, forming a sound base on which to manage social, economic and environmental issues. This is home to artist and writer Lin Barrie and her life partner, conservationist Clive Stockil. Expressing her hopes, fears and love for this special ecosystem with oil paints on canvas, Lin Barrie believes that the essence of a landscape, person or animal, can only truly be captured by direct observation. Lin Barrie states: “Through my art, and my writing, I feel an intimate connection with the natural world, and from my extensive field sketches of wild animals, people and landscapes, I create larger works on canvas. Lin's work is in various public and private collections in South Africa, Kenya, Zimbabwe, Australia, England, Canada, Sweden and the United States of America. She is represented by galleries in South Africa, Zimbabwe, England, Kenya and Florida, USA.
This entry was posted in Africa, African Safari, culture, Hogmanay, love, New Year, Scotland, Scottish Ceilidh, theatre and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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