Seattle, Kelli’s port for the next few months; Home of Jimi Hendrix and High Tech!

Seattle, on Puget Sound in the Pacific Northwest, is surrounded by water, mountains and evergreen forests, and encompasses thousands of acres of parkland (hence its nickname, “Emerald City”). It’s home to a thriving tech industry, with Microsoft and Amazon.com headquartered in its metropolitan area. The futuristic Space Needle, a legacy of the 1962 World’s Fair, is its most recognizable landmark. The Space Needle is an observation tower in Seattle, Washington, a landmark of the Pacific Northwest, and an icon of Seattle.
The Seattle area was previously inhabited by Native Americans for at least 4,000 years before the first permanent European settlers.[
Logging was Seattle’s first major industry, but by the late 19th century the city had become a commercial and shipbuilding center as a gateway to Alaska during the Klondike Gold Rush. By 1910, Seattle was one of the 25 largest cities in the country. However, the Great Depression severely damaged the city’s economy. Growth returned during and after World War II, due partially to the local Boeing company, which established Seattle as a center for aircraft manufacturing. Amazon.com, Microsoft, and T-Mobile US based in the area. The stream of new software, biotechnology, and Internet companies led to an economic boom. Since then, Seattle has become a hub for green industry and a model for sustainable development.[citation needed]

Seattle has a noteworthy musical history. From 1918 to 1951, there were nearly two dozen jazz nightclubs along Jackson Street, from the current Chinatown/International District, to the Central District. The jazz scene developed the early careers of Ray Charles, Quincy Jones, Ernestine Anderson and others. Seattle is also the birthplace of rock musician Jimi Hendrix. One of Hendrix’s mentors, BB King, has recently died- the passing of an icon-
In B.B. King, aspiring rockers discovered a profound emotional expression lacking in the era’s other great influence, Chuck Berry. With his admirable work ethic, snappy clothes and positive disposition, King modulated the blues’ roughest rural elements into an optimistic urbanity. He was both a fabulous entertainer and a real human being, self-effacing with a refreshing sense of humor. (Championed early on by Paul Butterfield and Eric Clapton, King found the audience he deserved following the release of Live at the Regal in 1964. He modeled the blues as a viable way to earn a living onstage).

A voracious musical sponge, Jimi Hendrix absorbed B.B. King’s urban blues alongside a panoply of more aggressive stylists. Hendrix covered “Every Day I Have the Blues” as a member of the Rocking Kings early in his career, and was known to turn up the bass on his amplifier to emulate King, whom he would interrogate for tips during run-ins on the package-tour circuit. Little Richard, with whom Hendrix played for several months, even criticized Hendrix for sounding too much like King. Leading his own trio, Hendrix would mimic B.B.’s sound by way of introducing King’s “Rock Me Baby,” and then took the Experience in another wild direction entirely. Yet “Hey Joe,” the trio’s hit single from Are You Experienced, is unimaginable without King’s single-string inspiration, and Hendrix’s unison guitar-vocal work in “Voodoo Chile” is straight out of King’s playbook

B.B. King, Eric Clapton wrote in his autobiography, is “without a doubt the most important artist the blues has ever produced.” The man who brought electric blues to the masses absorbed King’s vocabulary during stints in the Yardbirds and John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers (Mayall hired him specifically for the resemblance). As a member of Cream, Clapton left the lion’s share of writing to Jack Bruce and instead brought a handful of tasty blues covers to the trio. Clapton sped up King’s licks and gave them a loud, fluid psychedelic twist on his stack of Marshall amps. His more soulful sound in Blind Faith honed closer to that of King, with whom he’d jammed memorably at New York’s Cafe au Go Go in 1967. The two bluesmen finally collaborated on Riding With the King in 2000.

Pre-teenaged Carlos Santana fell under the influence of B.B. King as soon as he heard him on the radio in Tijuana. “I thought, ‘Man, that’s the stuff — this is the sort of music I want to do when I grow up,'” he recalled.

B.B. King was part of the package at the first rock show that Florida teenagers Duane and Gregg Allman ever attended. “Little brother,” said Duane to Gregg, “we’ve got to get into this.” Recording as the Hour Glass at Muscle Shoals’ FAME Studio in 1969, Gregg and Duane combined “Sweet Little Angel,” “It’s My Own Fault” and “How Blue Can You Get” from King’s 1964 Live at the Regal into the “B.B. King Medley,” with Duane unabashedly appropriating King’s bends and sustains. Equally significant was Regal’s influence on the Allman Brothers Band’s expansive double-set shows. Live at the Regal, Gregg Allman says in One Way Out, “is like one big long song, a giant medley. [King] never stopped. He just slammed it.” Records like Regal, Allman continued, “are what got me into doing everything so meticulously — paying attention to arrangements, the order of the songs.”

Food:
salmon to be one of the most interesting species of fish in the world. Salmon will travel up to 2,400 miles from the ocean without eating to the exact tributary where they were born. Along the way, they face waterfalls, beaver dams, bears, eagles and humans. Of the 10 percent that achieve the opportunity to spawn, their glory is rather short, as they all die soon afterwards. Talk about determination! Salmon rely on their strong sense of smell to help guide them to the tributary where they were born. They also use ocean currents, tides, and the gravitational pull of the moon while in the ocean.

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About wineandwilddogs

Lin Barrie The Save Valley Conservancy stretches along the upper reaches of the great Save River in the south east of Zimbabwe. The Gonarezhou National Park laps against the southern banks of the Save River and between these two nestles the Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve. These three celebrated wildlife areas form part of the Greater Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Area, (GLTFCA)- a unique wilderness jewel which is home to the “Big Five” (endangered Black and White rhinos, elephants, buffalo, lion, leopard) and the ”Little Six” (Klipspringer, Suni, Duiker, Steenbok, Sharpe's Grysbok and Oribi). Endangered African wild dogs, Cheetah, Brown hyena, Bat-eared foxes and a host of special birds and plants contribute to the immense variety of this ecosystem. Communities around the GLTFCA contribute to innovative partnerships with National Parks and the private sector, forming a sound base on which to manage social, economic and environmental issues. This is home to artist and writer Lin Barrie and her life partner, conservationist Clive Stockil. Expressing her hopes, fears and love for this special ecosystem with oil paints on canvas, Lin Barrie believes that the essence of a landscape, person or animal, can only truly be captured by direct observation. Lin Barrie states: “Through my art, and my writing, I feel an intimate connection with the natural world, and from my extensive field sketches of wild animals, people and landscapes, I create larger works on canvas. Lin's work is in various public and private collections in South Africa, Kenya, Zimbabwe, Australia, England, Canada, Sweden and the United States of America. She is represented by galleries in South Africa, Zimbabwe, England, Kenya and Florida, USA.
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